Universität Bonn
 

Institutionen-Mapping und Bibliographie zu
„Staatsversagen und Good Governance“

Institutional Mapping and Bibliography
on State Failure and Good Governance


5. Multilaterale Institutionen

5.1.1. Development Assistance Committee (DAC), OECD, Paris

5.1.2. World Bank, Washington

5.1.3. Europäischer Rat und EU-Kommission, Brüssel

5.1.4. United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)

5.1.5. Commonwealth, London

5.1.6. Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA), Addis Abeba

5.1.7. New Partnership for Africa's Development (NEPAD), Midrand/Johannesburg

5.2. Regionalorganisationen

5.2.1. African Union (AU), Addis Abeba

5.2.2. Organization of American States (OAS), Washington



Zurück zum Inhaltsverzeichnis / Return to Index Page


5.1.1. Development Assistance Committee (DAC), OECD, Paris

Difficult partnerships

Kurzbeschreibung:

The DAC’s focus on a partnership model which the partner country government steers has led to increasing attention to the issue of what to do in countries where this model does not fit. What can donor agencies do in situations where this partnership model, and in particular the role played by the government, does not seem likely to lead to effective use of aid? This is a topic relevant to essentially all DAC guidance and working groups. DAC-related discussions in 2001 have included an experts’ seminar in January on “Aid Effectiveness, Selectivity and Poor Performers” (in collaboration with the Development Centre); a forum on elusive partnerships in April focusing on “Working in countries with poor policy and governance environments”; and a discussion on “Poor Performers” at the April High Level Meeting (HLM).
The April HLM meeting asked that further work be done on this topic for the December 2001 Senior Level Meeting. As a result, the DAC Network on Good Governance and Capacity Development (GOVNET) was then tasked to produce the current paper, in co-ordination with the DAC Networks on Conflict, Peace and Development (CPDC) and Poverty Reduction (POVNET), and the Working Party on Aid Evaluation (WP-EV).
In keeping with the objective of the HLM request and the discussions at earlier meetings, this paper focuses on a definition of “poor performers” which is particularly relevant to the DAC work – i.e. on difficult partnerships where the usual DAC country-led model does not apply rather than on cases where government efforts are good but capacity is weak or outcomes poor.
It focuses on the active role donors can play in these difficult circumstances to: ensure that development assistance continues to reach the poor; remains effective as much as feasible, even where government-to-government aid is curtailed; and, importantly, helps to build the conditions for moving out of a “difficult partnership” situation to one of country-led poverty reduction. It addresses how development agencies might work to improve a “difficult partnership” situation with a key player, the government, as well as with civil society organisations.
In cases where the partner government is making its best efforts at taking the lead and performance, in the sense of outcomes, is country-led but weak, the DAC partnership model still applies in general. The issue is how best to assist that country in its efforts to address capacity, policy and outcomes. Almost all cases of “difficult partnerships” are compounded by weak capacity – not only in the public sector. This note considers what can be done in such cases, where weak capacity is an aggravating factor of a “difficult partnership”.
A “Joint Learning Process on difficult Partnerships (LAP)” exists. Quelle: Website (s.u.)

Publikationen:

DAC, 2002: Development Co-operation in Difficult Partnerships. Note by the Secretariat, 10.5.2002. Paris: DCD/DAC (11Rev 1). DAC-CPDC, 2002: Innovative Responses to Co-operation in fragile Situations. Preliminary Observations from Desk Review. Room document No.3. Third DAC Network on Conflict, Peace, and Development Co-Operation Meeting, Paris, 10-11 June 2002.
DAC, 2001: Poor Performers: Basic Approaches for Supporting Development in Difficult Partnerships. Note by the Secretariat, 27.11.2001. Paris: DCD/DAC (26/REV1).
n.a., 2002: Report on the Joint Workshop on Working in Difficult Partnerships, 25.11.2002. World Bank, OECD/DAC, European Commission, UNDP.
Milanovic, Branko, 2003: World Bank Judges Performance of Low-Income Countries. Washington, D.C.: Tides Center, Citizens' Network on Essential Services.

Links:

http://www.oecd.org/document/63/0,2340,en_2649_34565_
21679743_1_1_1_1,00.html




Projekt: Conflict Prevention and Post-Conflict Reconstruction Network (CPR)

Kooperation mit:

UNDP (5.1.4)


Projekt: Network on Good Governance

Kurzbeschreibung:

DAC work in the area of governance and capacity development is carried out primarily through its Network on Governance (GOVNET), an international forum that brings together practitioners of development co-operation agencies, both bilateral and multilateral, as well as experts from partner countries.
Over the past decade, the international community has increasingly recognised the centrality of “good governance” to poverty reduction and sustainable development. GOVNET aims at improving the effectiveness of donor assistance in governance and in support of capacity development. It provides members with a policy forum for exchanging experiences, and lessons, as well as identifying and disseminating good practice, and developing pro-poor policy and analytical tools.
Its work focuses on how to improve the effectiveness of support in a broad range of areas including: the fight against corruption, public sector reform, capacity development, human rights, democracy, the rule of law, assessing governance development, and difficult partnerships. The work of the Network also covers relationships between the State, citizens, civil society and the private sector.
The membership of the GOVNET is composed of representatives from responsible Ministries of DAC members and observers, experts from developing countries, international NGOs and policy research institutes. The GOVNET works in collaboration with other DAC subsidiary bodies and draws on and contributes to horizontal work within the OECD on a broad range of issues of governance and policy coherence. Quelle: Website (s.u.)

Publikationen:

OECD/DAC, 1997: Conflict, Peace and Development Co-operation on the Threshold of the 21st Century. DAC Policy Statement. Paris: Development Assistance Committee/ Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, http://www.oecd.org/dataoecd/31/39/2755375.pdf (Zugriff am 25.09.2003).

Links:

http://www.oecd.org/about/0,2337,en_2649_34565_1_1_1_1_1,00.html


5.1.2. World Bank, Washington

Low Income Countries under Stress (LICUS)

Kurzbeschreibung:

The Low Income Countries Under Stress (LICUS) Initiative is a new approach by the Bank to helping countries that face intertwined challenges such as very weak policies, weak institutions, and poor governance. Traditional aid programs have not worked well in these environments, primarily because governments lack the capacity or inclination to use finance effectively for poverty reduction.
Despite the difficulties, engagement with LICUS countries is critical if the Millennium Development Goals are to be achieved. Almost 500 million of the world's most disadvantaged citizens live in these countries. Total disengagement is, in any case, risky. It perpetuates poverty and possibly contributes to "state failure".
In 2002, a World Bank task force on LICUS recommended that the Bank and other donors maintain a more consistent engagement in LICUS countries, but also engage in a different way. As a result, the LICUS approach entails anchoring strategies in stronger political and economic analysis, mobilising and building domestic capacity for positive change, supporting simple and feasible entry-level reforms, and exploring innovative mechanisms for social service delivery. Close donor coordination is particularly critical in LICUS, where resources are typically meager and capacity low: greater consensus is needed on the principles of aid engagement and country-specific priorities.
The LICUS Initiative has moved into its implementation phase and is focusing on country-level strategy work; institutional reform; and operational and research partnerships with other donors.
Thirteen countries are the focus of LICUS pilot work for the fiscal years 2003 and 2004. New strategies for seven of these countries have been discussed by the Board. The FY03 pilot strategies initiated several innovative approaches to re-engagement and reform in a LICUS environment. These include:
A three-pronged strategy in Angola to to increase the transparency of oil revenue management;
A combination of top-down initiatives (policy dialogue, technical assistance, and exposure to the lessons of reform programs in other countries) with bottom-up community mobilization to implement reform priorities and accelerate poverty reduction in Tajikistan;
Early engagement in leadership capacity building in Sudan, and;
Support to programs to fight HIV/AIDS and develop export certification in Somalia.
Recognizing the need to operate more cohesively to support recovery and reform efforts in the most fragile countries, a number of innovative mechanisms are being implemented to increase donor cooperation on the ground. For instance, highly coordinated international efforts in Afghanistan and Timor Leste have yielded encouraging results under difficult circumstances. In 2003, the Bank joined with the UN and bilateral donors to carry out a Joint Needs Assessment for Liberia. Its findings were set out in a Results Focused Transitional Framework; reflecting a highly coordinated effort between Liberia's development partners and the country's transitional Government to focus reconstruction on an agreed set of priority results. Similar efforts are underway in Sudan, Comoros and the Central African Republic, aimed at increasing the coherence between peace-building and support for the economic, social and institutional recovery which is so critical to consolidate peace and stability.
A new LICUS trust fund has been approved by the Executive Directors of the Bank, allocating $25 million from the Bank's net income. The Trust Fund will help meet the financial challenges of reengagement in LICUS countries where reformers are often politically weak and require timely international support to build momentum for change; and where many of these countries are in arrears to the Bank, and thus unable to obtain funding during transition. Over the next three years, the LICUS Trust Fund will provide modest support for LICUS that are indebted to multilateral institutions to put basic reforms in place, strengthen social service delivery, and establish a track record for subsequent access to regular World Bank financing and debt relief.
An important part of the LICUS Initiative is ensuring that the Bank can deploy sufficient staff and resources to bridge the knowledge and dialogue gap in these countries. The Bank's human resource department is now putting in place a strategic staffing plan to help attract the best staff to LICUS. Bank senior management is devoting more time to LICUS and ensuring sufficient budgetary resources to enable an increase in the analytical work needed to improve our knowledge base in these countries. In addition, the World Bank Institute is now targeting part of its capacity building efforts to improving aid effectiveness in LICUS countries.
A number of initiatives have sought to address the linkages between peace-building and development in fragile states.
At the multilateral level, the UN Secretary General has appointed a High Level Panel on Threats, Challenges and Change, to propose ways to strengthen the collective security system.
The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Development Assistance Committee (DAC) has initiated an effort geared toward 'Difficult Partnerships'.
Work underway in bilateral agencies includes the US Task Force on Fragile States; the French Task Force on Financing Development, Global Public Goods, and Reducing Poverty; the UK Cabinet Strategy Office Unit Process on Failed States, and the Netherlands Stability Fund.
The Bank has worked closely with OECD/DAC and other donors to establish a Learning and Advisory Group to share ideas, research, and lessons learned. For bilateral donors, this early policy research focuses primarily on new models to increase coherence among foreign ministries, departments of defense and aid agencies. The Bank's contribution is in two primary areas:
On aid allocations, where early research completed by the Bank's Development Research Department indicates that aid to LICUS may be too low and too variable to support sustained poverty reduction and reform, even taking into account their weak institutions; and
On donor coordination models, where the Bank is helping to pilot, in close consultation with bilateral donors and the UN system, an integrated approach to peace-building and social and economic reconstruction.
The Bank is also initiating new research on Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers and LICUS, lessons of turnaround countries, and examples of effective aid delivery mechanisms.

Related Activities:

Country Policy and Institutional Assessment (CPIA) Quelle: Website (s.u.)

Publikationen:

World Bank, 2002: World Bank Group Work in Low-Income Countries under Stress: A Task Force Report. Washington, D.C.: World Bank.
Short, Clare/Gordon Brown, 2002: Statement. Development Committee, Sixty-fifth Meeting, Washington, D.C., 21.04.2002. International Monetary Fund/World Bank.

Links:

http://web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/NEWS/0,,contentMDK:
20127382~menuPK:34480~pagePK:34370~theSitePK:4607,00.html

http://www1.worldbank.org/operations/licus/documents/
2001CPIAResultsIDAcountries.pdf


Conflict Prevention and Reconstruction Unit (Social Development Department)

Kurzbeschreibung:

The World Bank views conflict prevention and post-conflict reconstruction as critical to its mission of poverty reduction. Through assessment of the causes, consequences and characteristics of conflict and the transfer of lessons learned, the Conflict Prevention and Reconstruction Unit works to design development efforts specific to conflict-affected countries. The Post-Conflict Fund provides financing for physical and social reconstruction initiatives in post-war societies. The Bank is playing a significant role in Afghanistan, Africa's Great Lakes region, the Balkans, Iraq, Liberia, Nepal, Sierra Leone, Timor Leste, the West Bank and Gaza, and other war-torn areas. Quelle: Website (s.u.)

Publikationen:

Berdal, Mats/David M. Malone (Hg.), 2000: Greed and Grievance. Economic Agendas in Civil Wars. Boulder (Col.)/London: Lynne Rienner.
Collier, Paul/Anke Hoeffler, 2001: Greed and Grievance in Civil War. Washington, D.C.: World Bank.
Collier, Paul et al., 2003: Breaking the Conflict Trap. Civil War and Development Policy. Washington D.C.: World Bank.
Berdal, Mats/David Keen, 1997: Violence and Economic Agendas in Civil Wars, in: Millennium, 26 (1997) 3, S. 795-818.
Beschel, Robert P. (Jr.), 2002: Rebuilding the Civil Service in a Post-Conflict Setting. Key Issues and Lessons of Experience. Dissemination Notes 1, March 2002. IBRD Conflict Prevention and Reconstruction Unit.
World Bank, 1998: Post-Conflict Reconstruction. The Role of the World Bank.
Schiavo-Campo, Salvatore, 2003: Financing and Aid Management Arrangements In Post-Conflict Situations. CPR Working Paper 6, June 2003. World Bank.

Links:

http://wbln0018.worldbank.org/essd/essd.nsf/Post-Conflict/home


World Bank Institute (WBI): Governance & Anti-Corruption

Kurzbeschreibung:

The World Bank views good governance and anti-corruption as central to its poverty alleviation mission. Nowadays, there are many units throughout the World Bank Group working on hundreds of governance and anti-corruption activities. They focus on internal organizational integrity, minimizing corruption on World Bank-funded projects, and assisting countries in improving governance and controlling corruption.
Combining participatory action-oriented learning, capacity-building tools, and the power of data, the World Bank Institute (WBI), in collaboration with many units in the World Bank Group, supports countries in improving governance and controlling corruption. Using a strategic and multidisciplinary approach, we apply action-learning methods to link empirical diagnostic surveys, their practical application, collective action, and prevention. Concrete results on the ground are emphasized in our learning programs. This integrated approach is supported by operational research and a comprehensive governance databank. Quelle: Website (s.u.)

Publikationen:

Kaufmann, Daniel, 2003: Rethinking Governance: Empirical Lessons Challenge Orthodoxy. Discussion Draft, 11.03.2003, World Bank Institute (WBI), Washington, D.C.
Kaufmann, Daniel/Aart Kraay/Pablo Zoido-Lobatón, 2000: Governance Matters: From Measurement to Action, in: Finance & Development – A quarterly magazine of the IMF, 37 (June 2000) 2.
Kaufmann, Daniel/Aart Kraay/Pablo Zoido-Lobatón, 1999: Aggregating Governance Indicators. Policy Research Working Paper 2195, October 1999. Washington, D.C.: World Bank & European Bank for Reconstruction and Development.
Kaufmann, Daniel/Aart Kraay, 2003: Governance and Growth: Causality which way? – Evidence for the World, in brief. Mimeo, February 2003, World Bank, Washington, D.C.
Kaufmann, Daniel/Aart Kraay, 2002: Growth without Governance, in: Economia, 3 (2002) 1, S. 169-229.
Kaufmann, Daniel/Aart Kraay/Pablo Zoido-Lobatón, 1999: Governance Matters. Policy Research Working Paper 2196, October 1999. Washington, D.C.: World Bank & World Bank Institute.
Kaufmann, Daniel/Aart Kraay/Massimo Mastruzzi, 2003: Governance Matters III: Governance Indicators for 1996-2002. Draft for Comment, 30.06.2003, World Bank, Washington, D.C.
Hellman, Joel S./Geraint Jones/Daniel Kaufmann, 2000: Seize the State, Seize the Day. State Capture, Corruption and Influence in Transition. Policy Research Working Paper 2444, September 2000. Washington, D.C: World Bank/World Bank Institute & European Bank of Reconstruction and Development.
Hellman, Joel S./Daniel Kaufmann, 2001: Confronting the Challenge of State Capture in Transition Economies, in: Finance & Development – A quarterly magazine of the IMF, 38 (September 2001) 3.
Hellman, Joel S./Geraint Jones/Daniel Kaufmann/Mark Schankerman, 2000: Measuring Governance, Corruption, and State Capture: How Firms and Bureaucrats Shape the Business Environment in Transition Economies. Policy Research Working Paper 2312, April 2000. Washington, D.C: World Bank & European Bank for Reconstruction and Development.
Ng, Francis/Alexander Yeats, 1998: Good Governance and Trade Policy: Are They the Keys to Africa’s Global Integration and Growth? Revised, 10. November 1998. Washington, D.C.: The World Bank: Development Research Group.

Links:

http://www.worldbank.org/wbi/governance/index.html

Governance Data:

Web-Interactive Inventory of Datasets and Empirical Tools:
http://www.worldbank.org/wbi/governance/govdatasets/



5.1.3. Europäischer Rat und EU-Kommission, Brüssel

Europäische Sicherheitsstrategie

Kurzbeschreibung:

Die Europäische Sicherheitsstrategie vom 12.12.2003 zählt zu den fünf Hauptbedrohungen den Terrorismus, die Verbreitung von Massenvernichtungswaffen, regionale Konflikte, das „Scheitern von Staaten“ und die organisierte Kriminalität. Diese Bedrohungen beeinflussen sich gegenseitig, können jeweils sowohl Ursache als auch Folge sein. Das „Scheitern eines Staates“ kann z.B. sowohl Folge als auch Ursache für das Wachstum krimineller Netzwerke sein. Diese Netzwerke können in „Extremfallen“ auch einen Staat „beherrschen“. Die Strategie beschreibt die Möglichkeit, dass Europa bei einer Summierung dieser verschiedenen Elemente einer sehr ernsten Bedrohung ausgesetzt sein könnte.

Links:

http://ue.eu.int/uedocs/cmsUpload/78367.pdf

5.1.4. United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)

Projekt: Conflict Prevention and Post-Conflict Reconstruction Network (CPR)

Kurzbeschreibung:

The need for the Network emerged at a meeting of post-conflict/transition and emergency units of multilateral and bilateral organizations, convened by the World Bank in Paris in April 1998. The participants of that meeting considered critical to improve networking and coordination among the various organizations working on complex emergencies, with the support of a knowledge-sharing platform.
An informal network, the CPR network meets every 6 months.
The CPR Network brings together 29 organizations operationally active in conflict prevention and mitigation, to improve operational effectiveness in conflict prevention and post-conflict reconstruction. Its objectives are: 1.) operational coordination 2.) knowledge-sharing 3.) improved effectiveness and innovation of CPR programming 4.) the development of practical tools 5.) the development of lessons learned and their application in the field 6.) collaborative mobilization and deployment of human and financial resources 7.) bridging policy/research and operations 8.) the identification of countries and situations for joint interventions 9.) training coordination and improved capacity to respond.
The CPR Network maintains an operational focus extending from the principles laid out by the Development Assistance Committee Task Force on Conflict, Peace and Development Cooperation and UN Executive Committees. It addresses issues pertaining to conflict prevention, post-conflict reconstruction, including rehabilitation, reintegration, reconciliation and peacebuilding, extended and protracted conflict environments, and bridging the gap between relief and development.
The CPR Network brings together 29 organizations active in conflict prevention and post-conflict reconstruction. Quelle: Website (s.u.)

Kooperation mit:

OECD/DAC (5.1.1)

Links:

http://www.developmentgateway.org/node/118839/atnManagement


Management Development and Governance Division, Bureau for Development Policy

Publikationen:

UNDP, o. J.: Governance and Conflict. (UNDP’s Programme). United Nations Development Programme, http://www.undp.org/governance/ (Zugriff am 08.10.2003).
UNDP, 1999: Governance Foundations for Post-Conflict Situations. United Nations Development Programme.
Salomons, Dirk, 2002: Local Governance Approach to Social Reintegration and Economic Recovery in Post-Conflict Countries: Programming Options for UNDP/UNCDF Assistance. Workshop „A Local Governance Approach to Post-Conflict Recovery”, New York, 08.10.2002. Institute of Public Administration (IPA), UNDP/United Nations Capital Development Fund, UNDP/Bureau for Conflict Prevention and Recovery.
UNDP, o. J.: Promoting Conflict Prevention and Conflict Resolution through effective Governance: A conceptual Survey and Literature Review. United Nations Development Programme, Management Development and Governance Division, Bureau for Development Policy.

Links:

http://magnet.undp.org/about_us/Mdgdbro.htm


UNDP Oslo Governance Centre

Kurzbeschreibung:

The Centre is UNDP's global facility on democratic governance. The Centre has been established to enhance programme activities and the advisory role of UNDP in the area of democratic governance. We assist UNDP country offices in their cooperation with governments and their partners, civil society organizations and people in developing countries. Our objective is to support countries in implementing democratic reforms necessary to achieve the Millennium Development Goals. The Centre has a special focus and competency in the area of access to justice, human rights, civil society, and governance and conflict prevention.
The UNDP Oslo Governance Centre and the Chr. Michelsen Institute have entered into a partnership to take forward key themes around the nexus between governance and poverty through an annual series of focused seminars and workshops. The 2004 seminar explored challenges and issues to be addressed in programming democratic governance initiatives in post conflict contexts. Within a conceptual framework that considers issues related to reconciliation, building trust and programme delivery, this event examined the implications of the early post conflict setting on democratic governance programming. It focussed specifically on access to information; democratic dialogue; electoral systems and processes; parliamentary development; decentralized governance; public administration reform; and justice, security and human rights. This topic was selected in order to address the still persistent problem in the quality of response in the immediate post conflict period. Many key actors are inadequately organized or prepared to address the challenges of this context and relevant knowledge to guide good practice often does not exist in a readily accessible and applicable form. The objective was to deepen UNDP’s and partners’ understanding of democratic governance in post-conflict contexts and contribute to the preparation of a UNDP practice note on Governance in Post-Conflict Situations. Quelle: Website (s.u.)

Publikationen:

United Nations Development Programme/Chr. Michelsen Institute, 2004: Governance Interventions in Post-War Situations: Lessons Learned. Conference on Governance in Post-Conflict Situations, Bergen, 5-7 May 2004.
http://www.undp.org/oslocentre/docs04/
BergenSeminar2004CMIResearchPaper.pdf

(u.v.m.)

Kooperation mit:

CMI (6.1.8)

Links:

http://www.undp.org/oslocentre/index.htm


5.1.5. Commonwealth, London

Democracy Section, Political Affairs Division

Kurzbeschreibung:

The Commonwealth is committed to a set of fundamental values spelt out in the Harare Commonwealth Declaration of 1991, at the core of which is belief in and adherence to democratic principles. We promote democracy through advocacy of democratic principles and practical action to help make them a reality: 1.) Mutual Assistance - we work to improve democratic arrangements through the observation of elections and the provision of technical assistance and training. 2.) Promotion of Best Practice - through the organisation of workshops, seminars and conferences and the production and circulation of publications we work to promote 'best practice' and in general to strengthen democratic values and culture. 3.) CMAG - the Commonwealth Ministerial Action Group, a group of eight Foreign Ministers, can take action against countries which are in "serious or persistent violation" of the democratic principles; The purpose is to ensure that democracy in the Commonwealth is a matter of substance, not merely the adoption of democratic forms. Quelle: Website (s.u.)

Ansprechpartner:

Christopher Child, Zippy Ojago, Ben Muir

Links:

http://www.thecommonwealth.org


5.1.6. Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA), Addis Abeba

Projekt: Promoting and Monitoring Good Governance, Development Policy and Management Programme

Kurzbeschreibung:

DPMD is managing the first large-scale continent-specific study ever to be undertaken to assess and monitor progress toward good governance in Africa. Based on 83 indicators developed by the division, results from 28 countries are being compiled in a new ECA annual called the Africa Governance Report, the first issue to be released in early 2004. The analysis will highlight best practices for peer learning, identify capacity gaps in various sectors, and make recommendations on addressing these deficits for improving governance.
DPMD's work is founded on National Country Studies, conducted in collaboration with local research partners, which include perceptions from national Expert Panels-of at least 100 members per country-about such topics as political representation and elections; the structure, capacities, and effectiveness of government; respect for human rights and the rule of law; the investment climate; the role of civil society; the operational environment for the media, and the overall effectiveness of the government's economic management. The views of the general populace are captured through extensive household surveys on the accessibility, adequacy and efficiency of government services; both instruments were supplemented by desk research.
Country-level ownership of the assessment process is central to the whole DPMD project. Therefore, a series of mechanisms have been put in place to ensure the country's involvement, including various national stakeholder workshops. Each collaborating institution also established a Steering Committee to guide the project whose members represent political parties, civil service, the judiciary, parliament, law enforcement agencies, civil society organizations, religious groups, and business and professionals.
DPMD work in this area involves: 1.) providing technical cooperation with partners in data collection and management. 2.) undertaking analysis and synthesizing results from 28 country reports. 3.) supporting in-country efforts to build stakeholder participation in monitoring governance. Quelle: Website (s.u.)

Ansprechpartner:

Okey Onyejekwe (Senior Development Management Officer)

Publikationen:

Economic Commission for Africa, 2004: Striving for Good Governance in Africa. Synopsis of the 2005 African Governance Report, Prepared for the African Development Forum IV. Addis Abeba, http://www.iss.org.za/AF/RegOrg/uneca/agren2005.pdf (Zugriff am 13.10.2004).

Links:

http://www.uneca.org/eca_programmes/development_policy_
management/default.htm

Kooperation mit:

Benin: Cellule d'Analyse de Politique Economique (CAPE), Botswana: Botswana Institute for Development Policy Analysis (BIDPA), Burkina Faso : Centre pour la gouvernance Démocratique (CGD), Cameroun : Centre d'Etudes et de recherche en Economie Gestion (CEREG), Chad : RAD-S.A. Recherche & Actions pour le Développement, Egypt: Faculty of Economics and Political Science (Cairo University), Ethiopia: Regional and Local Development Studies, Gabon: Institut Sous-Régional Multisectoriel de Technologie Appliquée de Planification et d'Evaluation de Projets (ISTA), The Gambia: University of the Gambia, Ghana: Ghana Center for Democratic Development (CDD-Ghana), Kenya: African Center for Economic Growth (ACEG), Lesotho: Institute of Southern African Studies (ISAS), Malawi: Center for Social Research, Mali: Koni Expertise, Morocco: Centre Africain de Formation et de Recherche Administratives pour le Développement (CAFRAD), Mauritius: Stra Consult, Mozambique: Centro de Estudos Estratégicos e Internacionais do Instituto superior de Realçoes Internacionais (CEEI-ISRI) / Center for Strategic and International Studies (CEEI-ISRI), Namibia: Multidisciplinary Research and Consultancy Center (MRCC), Niger: Cabinet d'Etudes, de Recherches, Conseils, Analyse et Prospective (CERCAP), Nigeria: Development Policy Center, Rwanda: Consortium formé de BEATER SARL et UNR: Faculté des sciences Economiques, Sociales et de gestion, Senegal: Institut Africain pour la Democratie (IAD), Swaziland: Uniswa Consultancy and Training Centre (CTC), South Africa: The Institute of Democracy in South Africa (IDSA), Tanzania: Department of Political Science and Public Administration , Uganda: Center for Basic Research (CBR),, Zambia: Centre for Policy Research & Analysis (CePRA), Zimbabwe: Southern African Political Economy Series Trust (SAPES Trust)


Projekt: African Development Forum (ADF IV) on "Governance for a Progressing Africa" 11 - 15 October 2004

Kurzbeschreibung:

In the past decade, the transition of many states from authoritarian regimes to pluralistic and democratic systems has created demands from citizens for effective, participatory governance structures and services. ECA seeks to support and strengthen the "capable state"-one with transparent, accountable political and economic systems, and efficient public institutions providing an enabling environment for the private sector and civil society to play their respective roles in national efforts.
A widespread consensus has been building throughout the continent that good governance is essential for transforming Africa's economy. Indeed, it is one of the key pillars of the New Partnership for Africa's Development (NEPAD). There is an imperative to build upon NEPAD and the framework of the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM), which ensures that national policies and procedures conform to agreed-on political, economic and corporate governance codes and standards.
The nexus between strong institutional capacities and sustainable development has been central in the development discourse for quite some time. Good governance is important and necessary for effective institutional growth, and, at the same time, institutional effectiveness is not possible without good governance. The Forum will present an opportunity for all participants to gain a deeper understanding of the dimensions of governance, address key challenges, coordinate initiatives, and develop plans. One of the objectives of the ADF IV is to generate realistic strategies for good governance practices, mainly addressing the capacity building challenges, at the national, sub-regional and continental levels. Quelle: Website (s.u.)

Links:

http://www.uneca.org/adf/adfiv/background.htm

Kooperation mit:

African Development Bank (ADB), AU (5.2.1)


5.1.7. New Partnership for Africa's Development (NEPAD), Midrand/Johannesburg

Priority Area: Political Governance

Kurzbeschreibung:

NEPAD is designed to address the current challenges facing the African continent. Issues such as the escalating poverty levels, underdevelopment and the continued marginalisation of Africa needed a new radical intervention, spearheaded by African leaders, to develop a new Vision that would guarantee Africa’s Renewal. It treats good governance as a basic requirement for peace, security and sustainable political and socio-economic development. The first NEPAD priority area includes democracy and good, political, economic and corporate governance. The “Declaration on democracy, political, economic and corporate governance” and a “Democracy and Political Governance Initiative” relate to these goals.
The most important governance element in NEPAD is the African Peer Review Mechanism. Its mandate is to ensure that the policies and practices of participating states conform to the agreed political, economic and corporate governance values, codes and standards contained in the above-mentioned declaration. The APRM is the mutually agreed instrument for self-monitoring by the participating member governments. Quelle: Website (s.u.)

Links:

http://www.nepad.org


5.2. Regionalorganisationen

5.2.1. African Union (AU), Addis Abeba
Kurzbeschreibung:

Among the goals of the African Union is the promotion of democratic principles and institutions, popular participation and good governance. In 2000, it decided to found a “Conference on Security, Stability Development and Co-operation in Africa (CSSDCA)” and the respective declaration established the fundamental principles for the promotion of Democracy and Good Governance on the continent. In the Commission, Good Governance falls under the portfolio of Political Affairs, while the Peace and Security Council and the responsible commissioner are concerned with the later stages of state failure and associated crisis. Quelle: Website (s.u.)

Ansprechpartner:

Amb. Said Djinnit (Peace and Security), Mrs. Julia Dolly Joiner (Political Affairs)

Links:

http://www.africa-union.org


5.2.2. Organization of American States (OAS), Washington

Unit for the Promotion of Democracy

Kurzbeschreibung:

“Strategic Programs for Democratic Strengthening”: Strategic action in critical institutional and cultural areas of the democratic process is the objective of this first work area of the Unit. It promotes lines of action directed at achieving the following goals: supporting parliamentary institutionality as the core of representative democracy; boosting decentralization processes as a key factor in bringing governments closer to the citizenry and facilitating citizen participation; and, promoting new leadership and building a democratic culture.
Special post-conflict and democratic transition programs carried out in countries or regions in a post-conflict or democratic transition phase, such as Nicaragua, Guatemala, Haiti. Quelle: Website (s.u.)

Links:

http://www.upd.oas.org